CZECHIA

Together with Filip Slivka, we’ve published the Czechia zine that was initially only supposed to map the bizarreness we saw around us daily, in a slightly mocking way. At that time, the new official weirdo name for our country, Czechia, was being approved and it seemed to fit our project nicely. In the end, we realized that we actually love all those, at first sight, ridiculous things because they bring a little life into the ruin and routine we are living.
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For me, analog photography isn’t a nostalgic rediscovery of something forgotten, in fact, I started when I was six and practically haven’t stopped since. My first picture was a blurry black squirrel.

Together with Filip Slivka, we’ve published the Czechia zine that was initially only supposed to map the bizarreness we saw around us daily, in a slightly mocking way. At that time, the new official weirdo name for our country, Czechia, was being approved and it seemed to fit our project nicely. In the end, we realized that we actually love all those, at first sight, ridiculous things because they bring a little life into the ruin and routine we are living. 

I still continue with the series because if one keeps their eyes open, the resources here are bottomless.

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Photography & Text / Petr Bláha
Czechia zine / Petr Bláha & Filip Slivka

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