fashion

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Creepyyeha, the lingerie brand founded by Yeha Leung, specializes in tantalizing pieces made to measure and pleasure. We sat down with the designer to find out more about her beginnings and how her approach has changed throughout her career for you to read before ordering your very own pastel leather pieces.
When you grow up around the idea that feeling comfortable in your own skin as a woman is frowned upon and despicable, rebellion is just a thong away. Predominantly lingerie designer Shangrila Jarusiri, the owner of the Maison Shangrila brand, talks to SWARM Mag about Southeast Asian childhood, punk rock and sexual liberation.
In her collections, Slovenian fashion designer Lucija Kejzar turns to her roots in a retort to contemporary fast fashion: opting for traditional tailoring techniques, textiles and details, she actualizes garments now only found in museums for the 21st century.
SWARM Mag is a family with roots deep down some rich, dark, fertile places. We like to sift through the hidden, shiny onyx sands of up-and-coming creativity to dig out whatever is thriving down there and bring it to you. But how did this peculiar chemistry happen? In our newest editorial, you finally get to meet the SWARM family face to corpse paint.
The Czech designer Cindy Kutíková combines different crafts in expanding the conception of fashion design. Her thesis project, an outfit from 90.000 beads and 2.5km of thread, served as proof of concept for the interdisciplinary artist’s subsequent founding of a design brand. Today’s interview provides Cindy’s insight into the industry, her creative process and why she chose the traditional Czech format of glass beads.
Jude Macasinag is an emerging Filipino fashion designer making waves on the French scene and soon, no doubt, across the globe. The article highlights his extensive MANIFESTO collection, which delves into themes of self, family, longing, uncertainty, grief, joy, and grief by “tapping into the 'human' side of why we wear clothes.”
In seeking to infuse the jewellery industry with eco-friendly values, Movement – Arts – Mission (MAM) lead the way by example in their collections. Having received their sustainability certification earlier this year, they now spread their mission further through their cutting-edge and futuristic craftsmanship from 100% recycled metals. In today’s interview you will get to explore the brand’s design philosophy and adornments.
Working with the rich resources of family and folklore, Silvia Leitmannová’s collection traces several generations of women in her family to explore not only the history of fashion, but also her familial roots in western Slovakia. In today’s interview, you will get to explore the author’s delicate narrative for the project, her plans for the future, and the meaning of Schena Maaro in the Kľačno dialect.
The approach of Czech fashion designer Barbora Procházková has its roots firmly planted in the fertile soil of meaningful co-creation. By creating made-to-measure packages of customizable cut patterns with instructions, her Project SAPIENCE strives to encourage a hands-on and intimate relationship with our garments.
In reframing the industry’s superficial narratives of representation, Paris-based fashion designer Mehmet creates politically charged garments to reframe the contemporary image of migrant peoples. “We all claim for diversity, equality, and integrity, but just few people question the roots, and I wanted to be relevant in a time of ultra-passiveness.” Dive into her muses, inspirations and creative process in today’s article.
“[In Georgia,] there are as many contributing factors as hindering circumstances.” In an exclusive interview, fashion designer Aleksandre Akhalkatsishvili uncovers how Georgian sartorial customs influence his clean-cut, sombre arrangements and silhouettes, how does he employ the deconstructivist practice in his creative process, and talks about the feral femme energy he is drawn to.
“The current ideal is to conform and control, be part of a system or dominating force... you’re only relevant if you look a certain way.” In unbraiding the ropes learned through socialization, London-based multidisciplinary artist Rhiannon Davies’ collections weave inspirations spanning Celtic mythology, Fleetwood Mac and equestrian fashion to explore the contemporary notion of perfection.
How strange is it that everyone knows a horse girl? From the more cutesy depths of human kinks and obsessions, House SWARM is bringing you the first original editorial of 2022, fit right for a confusing, animal-lover and enigmatic summer.
If you glean inspiration by René Magritte from the wearable art by fashion designer and artist Venera Kazarova, you are not wrong. Whimsical videos and photoshoots feature peculiar humanoids morphing with animals and flowers made of fabric and paper – the artist's favourite material – about the love for which, and more, she talks in the interview below.
Aposematism in animals – bright, patterned colouration – exists to warn off predators. But colour plays a vastly different, nearly opposite role in the collections by Slovak fashion designer Dominika Kozáková. Playful, crustacean- or bunny-like elements emerge in elaborate and soft headwear, which invites us to hug and snuggle. Interview with the designer follows below.
ZSIGMOND is a sustainable menswear brand from Hungary with a palpable connection to heritage, soil and traditional garment-making, which reflects also in the brand's sustainability efforts. The collections feature remade pieces that are recycled, reversible, sometimes crafted of century old collected folklore textiles or dyed with plant and fruit pigments. ZSIGMOND's founder Dora kindly let us into her world via an in-depth interview.
The political edge of Sample’s recent fashion collection points at the industry’s ossified binary structures and practices. Last year’s release saw a turning point in the designers’ approach, turning this time to a radical representation of what sports clothes can mean in the anthropocene, and today’s article goes in-depth to their motivations.
Austrian fashion designer Maximilian Rittler is not one to shy away from boldness. From the candid editorials, we get a whiff of the backstage of the golden era of glam rock, hairspray, glitter, velur, and all. In the interview, he talks the magic of creation, the power of music, and Antwerp's bustling culture scene.
The early morning summer sun filtering through the leaves, flickering under the eyelids and warmly kissing your skin; vast fields of cereal rippling in the caressing breeze. The work of fashion designer Emma Bruschi reflects the romanticized notion of places where humankind still tries to utilize, understand and revere natural resources without outwardly exploiting them.
Linus Stueben, a London-based German fashion designer whose work has been referred to as “disgustingly cute”, utilizes storytelling as the cornerstone of his playful, tongue-in-cheek wearable creations, each piece an anecdote, a tale. Are we all secretly governed by dogs?