IT’S A GAME FOR US

Fashion designer Barbora Kotěšovcová, studying at Prague's Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design, perceives humans as AI systems with naturally malfunctioning default settings.
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“AI (Artificial Intelligence) was a topic for me since last semester when I dealt with system errors and what a computer programme can do without human supervision. I decided to broaden the “error” theme and find out what it really means for me when we apply it to a social sector,” Barbora describes her thought processes behind the IT’S A GAME FOR US collection, created in 2018. “It’s not a technologic or PC system but a human system and communication, the societal system and how one behaves within.”

“How do we perceive mistakes and flaws and how important are those for us?” Barbora asks herself. “When a human being experiences and errs, they create a protective immunity for similar upcoming events, which they will, hopefully, solve better. Therefore, through these fashion pieces, I tried to communicate something that disrupts our personal comfort. Although we might not be fans, we need such disruptions because they push our comfort zone further and make us feel better in the long run.”

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CREDITS

Photography / SHOTBY.US

Fashion designer / Barbora Kotěšovcová

Hair / Lukáš Máčala

MUA / Vendula Niklová

Light designer / Jan Pančocha

Models / Aneta @anet.bursikova & Laura 

Agency/ Pure Model Management

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