BATKIM, HORNIE & VILLAIN

Experimental fashion design translates into an alter-ego villain performance in the pictures and videos by Korean designer Kim. The mood of her works stands somewhere between sportswear snaps and satire.
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WORDS BY THE AUTHOR / We get to hear pretty is good and ugly is bad. But I was a jealous person. I was selfish. I was spoiled. I was angry about things. I didn’t appreciate myself. I was hurt. I was just like a mischievous kid with horns in a cartoon. I felt this inferiority all over.

But…

So what? I am angry but I gotta express this. I am angry because things happen in life and I will express it but in a beautiful way. How I express my anger is honest and beautiful as a woman. And one day I filmed myself looking in the camera, dancing angrily but wearing the clothes I was prototyping at home at the time. I danced like a bat. I wanted to be an angry bat.

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That is how I started my brand. Or started to have character inside the clothes. So to sum it up in one sentence – it is about displaying your insecurity and maybe your anger but clothing it on a woman’s body and being beautiful. Pulling out beautiful out of insecurity. So my inspiration could be insecurity….

The themes I chose are: a bat, a fairy. My suits’ names are: Batkim, Hornie (with many horns symbolizing my hurt feelings but also expressing my sexual desire as a woman, simulating the pronunciation ‘horny’.)

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BIO / I am 26 years old. I am modeling my own clothes I create. It is fun to realize imagery that I have in my head, it is quite fulfilling. I graduated from a fashion design school in Milan. I knew I wanted to design clothes since I was a child but I thought it would only be a hobby. When I hit 18, I figured maybe this could be the only thing that I ever wanted to do. As I grew up in Korea, I went to a fashion school in Korea but didn’t really like the education so I chose this one in Milan called ‘Naba’. I developed what was gonna be my brand as a graduation theme but I didn’t know if it was going to be an actual brand, I was a bit skeptical. But instead of being sad, I continued to make clothes again and again whenever I had time and take photos of them to upload on Instagram just to know what my friends think. I just didn’t look in the future, I made clothes in the present and as I could not get a model as I didn’t’ know many people in Milan, I just modeled them myself and it kinda became natural.

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Fashion designer / Kim aka Villain @__villainofficial

Lookbook Photo /

Photographer @ladislav_kyllar

Stylist @silvia_arsenie

MUA @honeymartina_mua

Fairy VALENTINE FAIRY EDITION // Photo by @benlives 

TV serie //  Photo @benlives

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