Františka Blažková

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“[In Georgia,] there are as many contributing factors as hindering circumstances.” In an exclusive interview, fashion designer Aleksandre Akhalkatsishvili uncovers how Georgian sartorial customs influence his clean-cut, sombre arrangements and silhouettes, how does he employ the deconstructivist practice in his creative process, and talks about the feral femme energy he is drawn to.
This one goes “right in the feels”. Pardon us but we couldn't help but stick our noses into your FAMILY BUSINESS. And now the consequence of our actions are haunting us all. The article is accompanied by a whimsically plushy animation by illustrator and animator Charlie Spies.
Oskar Zięta introduces the glossy, otherworldly apparitions made of polished steel coagulating to life in the family-run Zieta studio. These mirrors/objects with bionic silhouettes are made to resemble glimpses of the natural world in which they are often put on display, nearly merging.
Rahel Süßkind, also creating under the alias Chrissy Fahrenbruch, mirrors in her singular illustrations “the world as she sees it”. These cutesy, vivid visions include bipedal animal hybrids such as Snooh, a friendly green character kneaded into existence from no other substance than… phlegm. Enjoy a slightly oozy interview with the author.
How strange is it that everyone knows a horse girl? From the more cutesy depths of human kinks and obsessions, House SWARM is bringing you the first original editorial of 2022, fit right for a confusing, animal-lover and enigmatic summer.
If you glean inspiration by René Magritte from the wearable art by fashion designer and artist Venera Kazarova, you are not wrong. Whimsical videos and photoshoots feature peculiar humanoids morphing with animals and flowers made of fabric and paper – the artist's favourite material – about the love for which, and more, she talks in the interview below.
Are human beings not insular individuals but teeming interspecies colonies of assorted tissues and bacteria? Czech intermedia artist Nela Pietrová links visual art with research practice to find a deeper understanding of the queer nature of metamorphosing (co-)dependent substances and, ultimately, herself.
In a free-wheeling interview, Belarus-born mixed-media and 3D artist Volcia Porakh afforded us a little glimpse into her world, that took us all the way to summer-sun coloured childhood memories smelling of playfulness, wide-eyed discoveries, old Disney comics, and warm, melted plasticine.
In an insightful and poignant essay, art theorist Tereza Špinková takes a fascinating plunge into the perceived Anthropocentric border on which liminal animals, othereness, monsters, and non-human-centred art currently exist. Ethereal, primordial-like digital fuzziness provided by illustrator Juliana Höschlová accompanies the written piece.
Where others see demonic human-animal hybrids, illustrator Anna Dietzel sees creatures just doing their thing, vibing and simply existiing. Get to know her world of black backgrounds, slithering bodies, fangs and unsettling smiles in an interview for SWARM Mag.
When encountering the works of Austrian illustrator Lony Mathis, the first look reveals the squishy cuteness of inflatable toys and the second one some lurking, vaguely disturbing details. In an exclusive interview, she talks the destructive powers of perfectionism, favourite aesthetics, and dogs' unconditional love.
Art-curatorial project Is It Just a Myth? moves across physical and virtual landscapes. The visitor experiences an encounter with the work and untouched nature through the flat screen of their device. Via these means, curator Bára Čápová is looking for new ways of creating and presenting art at the border between online and physical interfaces.
“Everyone should have beauty. Everyone should have access to beauty.” Chances are you have never seen anything like Nina Sivager's embroidered and tapestry-infused concrete house banners and decorative tiles, which manufacturing process was inspired by medieval handicraft.
A contemplative piece by Barbora Čápová outlines the future of the environment in which we display artworks and why we’ll never get rid of physical galleries. Accompanied by thematic illustrations by Rafał Kwiczor.
Like a quilting thread, the concept of heritage is sewn into the core of fashion designer Michaela Čapková’s works, which often stem from a reflection of inspiring personas.
Painter, musician and a resident Prague party vampire Jan Vytiska constructs a world where folk costumes, corpses, farmer's wives, hanging eyeballs, hairy-faced girls and general decay make acquaintance.
Would the village animals love to partake in folklore festivities they've seen with their human counterparts? Mária Gloza's paintings have the answer.
From grain to linen, the creators of the Ukraine-based Para Platform create handmade futuristic garments from organic materials with an unwavering belief that the respect for and the worship of Nature and her creations will, again, come into mainstream fashion.
A voluminous photographic collection by Václav Jirásek documents the workers, interiors and monumentality of decaying, perishing and abandoned Czech and Moravian metallurgic works.
Creating under the moniker of Alice Hualice, the artist mirrors the land, its history and scarce inhabitants in mesmerizing, intentionally under-elaborate textile objects.