Františka Blažková

Browse the archive and filter by theme or category
Filter by theme
Filter by category
Molly, who named herself, is an AI guide who was custom-made for the 2022 Lunchmeat Festival, a famed Prague's, Czechia, audiovisual intermedia treat. She introduces artists, events, and news by crafting her own texts and her ever-changing face graces this year's visuals. We bring you an exclusive interview with Molly and, at the same time, extend an invitation to this year's 'Lunchmeat'. We see you dancin'!
Plody Erlanu, the new Czech ceramic design studio led by David Střeleček, blurs the line between utility and aesthetics. Having established themselves with their cutting-edge vision brought to reality and now reaping the first fruits of their labor, this is one brand to certainly keep your eye on. Dive into today’s interview to learn about Plody Erlanu’s mission, approach and plans for the future.
Through paintings inhabited by enigmatic fluttering creatures, rippling with pleasant waveforms and a masterful play of surfaces, Czech painter Jakub Tytykalo teases the viewers' minds with subconscious imagery that materilizes a diferrent inner vision for each perceptive pair of eyes.
Jude Macasinag is an emerging Filipino fashion designer making waves on the French scene and soon, no doubt, across the globe. The article highlights his extensive MANIFESTO collection, which delves into themes of self, family, longing, uncertainty, grief, joy, and grief by “tapping into the 'human' side of why we wear clothes.”
Brussels-based painter Louise De Buck currently focuses on portraying strength and mystique through the naked female form. Her heroines, who she claims bear fragments of her own character, express solitude, the fragile states of reciprocated intimacy, and hints of animistic tendencies.
The fairytale-hued world of Slovak painter and visual artist Anna Štefanovičová is occupied by peculiar denizens – marionettes in endless variations. Inspired by the deep-rooted tradition of Bohemian puppet makers and her earliest terrifying childhood memory, Anna aims to work through discomfort, which she perceives as cathartic.
Enjoy Zuzana Trachtová's slightly NSFW, candid and eye-opening collection of couples' direct observations of the minute or significant shifts in the romantic and sexual layers of their relationships after one of the partners gave birth. Accompanied by illustrations by Kim Zemene.
The approach of Czech fashion designer Barbora Procházková has its roots firmly planted in the fertile soil of meaningful co-creation. By creating made-to-measure packages of customizable cut patterns with instructions, her Project SAPIENCE strives to encourage a hands-on and intimate relationship with our garments.
“A kiss still feels different from the inside of an oyster.” Robert Brambora's multidisciplinary works aim to infiltrate our minds with disembodied sensory experiences, questioning of the nature of relationships, and squishy feelings of titillating unease, as he uncovers in the interview below.
“[In Georgia,] there are as many contributing factors as hindering circumstances.” In an exclusive interview, fashion designer Aleksandre Akhalkatsishvili uncovers how Georgian sartorial customs influence his clean-cut, sombre arrangements and silhouettes, how does he employ the deconstructivist practice in his creative process, and talks about the feral femme energy he is drawn to.
This one goes “right in the feels”. Pardon us but we couldn't help but stick our noses into your FAMILY BUSINESS. And now the consequence of our actions are haunting us all. The article is accompanied by a whimsically plushy animation by illustrator and animator Charlie Spies.
Oskar Zięta introduces the glossy, otherworldly apparitions made of polished steel coagulating to life in the family-run Zieta studio. These mirrors/objects with bionic silhouettes are made to resemble glimpses of the natural world in which they are often put on display, nearly merging.
Rahel Süßkind, also creating under the alias Chrissy Fahrenbruch, mirrors in her singular illustrations “the world as she sees it”. These cutesy, vivid visions include bipedal animal hybrids such as Snooh, a friendly green character kneaded into existence from no other substance than… phlegm. Enjoy a slightly oozy interview with the author.
How strange is it that everyone knows a horse girl? From the more cutesy depths of human kinks and obsessions, House SWARM is bringing you the first original editorial of 2022, fit right for a confusing, animal-lover and enigmatic summer.
If you glean inspiration by René Magritte from the wearable art by fashion designer and artist Venera Kazarova, you are not wrong. Whimsical videos and photoshoots feature peculiar humanoids morphing with animals and flowers made of fabric and paper – the artist's favourite material – about the love for which, and more, she talks in the interview below.
Are human beings not insular individuals but teeming interspecies colonies of assorted tissues and bacteria? Czech intermedia artist Nela Pietrová links visual art with research practice to find a deeper understanding of the queer nature of metamorphosing (co-)dependent substances and, ultimately, herself.
In a free-wheeling interview, Belarus-born mixed-media and 3D artist Volcia Porakh afforded us a little glimpse into her world, that took us all the way to summer-sun coloured childhood memories smelling of playfulness, wide-eyed discoveries, old Disney comics, and warm, melted plasticine.
In an insightful and poignant essay, art theorist Tereza Špinková takes a fascinating plunge into the perceived Anthropocentric border on which liminal animals, othereness, monsters, and non-human-centred art currently exist. Ethereal, primordial-like digital fuzziness provided by illustrator Juliana Höschlová accompanies the written piece.
Where others see demonic human-animal hybrids, illustrator Anna Dietzel sees creatures just doing their thing, vibing and simply existiing. Get to know her world of black backgrounds, slithering bodies, fangs and unsettling smiles in an interview for SWARM Mag.
When encountering the works of Austrian illustrator Lony Mathis, the first look reveals the squishy cuteness of inflatable toys and the second one some lurking, vaguely disturbing details. In an exclusive interview, she talks the destructive powers of perfectionism, favourite aesthetics, and dogs' unconditional love.